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Grow your own hardy flowers from seed

HOW TO GROW THEM 


Outdoors they may be sown any time in June to August — the earlier the better, 
for the plants will then become stronger and better established before winter. A cold- 
frame is an ideal place in which to sow Perennials, but, if you have none, prepare a 
seed-bed of finely sifted light soil, made rich by adding and mixing with it thoroughly 
well-rotted barnyard manure, sheep manure, or humus. Sow the seed in shallow drills 
or squares of suitable size, partitioned off with laths; cover J^inch or more, according 
to the size of the seed — the very fine ones should only be pressed into the soil; press 
down with a flat board; water gently but thoroughly through a fine rose and do not 
allow the soil to become dry while the seed is in the process of germination, for as soon 
as the seed has sprouted and until it becomes a plant with roots, its life depends entirely 
on soil-moisture. It is fatal to allow the soil to become dry for even five minutes 
during this period and nearly all failures in growing perennials are attributable to this 


neglect. Seed-beds must, therefore, be shaded from the sun in summer and carefully 
watched and watered until the plants have made from four to five leaves. While 
most of the hardy flowers germinate in from eight to fourteen days, there are some 
which take a month or more before they come up, so do not become impatient. If 
seedlings come up too thick, pull out some and transplant elsewhere in boxes or other 
seed-beds, and when plants are finally large enough they will be ready for setting out 
in their permanent places. This, however, should not be done later than October 1, 
in order to allow sufficient time for them to take a firm hold in the soil before frost. 
Cover over winter with leaves or salt hay, applied after the ground is frozen (about 
the middle of December). Too early covering sometimes causes heating and con- 
sequent decay of plants, and it also encourages field-mice, which often do harm to the 
plants. Explicit cultural directions will be found on each packet of our seeds. 


Height 


Acanthus mollis 3 ft. 

Achillea millefolium rubrum 2 ft. 

Ptarmica, the Pearl 2 K ft. 


Aconitum Napellus 3 ft. 

Wilsoni 5 ft. 

Adlumia cirrhosa (Allegheny Vine) 15 ft. 

Agrostemma coronaria atrosanguinea 

(Rose Campion) 2 ft. 

Allwoodi alpinus. (New) for Rocks 4 in. 

Alstrcemeria, Mixed Hybrids 2 ft. 

Alyssum saxatile compactum 9 in. 

Anchusa italica, Dropmore 4 ft. 

italica, Opal. (New.) 4-5 ft. 

Anemone Pulsatilla 9-12 in. 

St. Brigid 10 in. 

sylvestris 12 in. 

Aquilegia caerulea 3 ft. 

chrysantha 2 ft. 

Copper Queen. (New.) 3 ft. 

glandulosa major 3 ft. 

glandulosa superba 2-3 ft. 

Mrs. Scott Elliott's strain of Long- 

spurred Hybrids 3 ft. 

Rose Queen. Long-spurred 3 ft. 

Schling ’3 Giant Long-spurred Hybrids . .3 ft. 
White Queen. Long-spurred 2 'A ft. 


Arabia alpina. (Rock Cress) 5 in. 

Armeria Laucheana (Double Sea Thrift) .6 in. 

Aster subcaeruleus 2 ft. 

Asters, Perennial. (Michaelmas Daisy ). 3 ft. 

alpinus, Blue. (Dwarf.) 12 in. 

alpinus, Goliath. (Dwarf.) 6-10 in. 

alpinus superbus 12 in. 

Amellus hybridus 2 ft. 

Aubrietia deltoidea graeca (Wall Cress). .6 in. 

deltoidea Leichtlinii 6 in. 

Beilis perennis, Schling’s Giant Double. 

Giant White 6 in. 

Giant Pink 6 in. 

Giant Red 6 in. 

Giant Mixed 6 in. 

Campanula carpatica 12 in. 

carpatica alba 12 in. 

grandiflora. Blue 2 ft. 

persicifolia grandiflora. Blue 2 ft. 

persicifolia alba grandiflora 2 ft. 

persicifolia Moerheimi 2 ft. 

pyramidalis, Blue 4 ft. 

pyramidalis, White 4 ft. 

Candytuft. See Iberis. 


Time of 
Flowering 

Color 

Pkt. 

July, Aug. 

White 

Jo IO 

June-Oct. 

Pink 

25 

June-Sept. 

White 

25 

Aug.-Oct. 

Dark blue 

25 

Aug.-Nov. 

Pale blue 

25 

July-Sept. 

Pale rose 

25 

July-Sept. 

Crimson 

IO 

June-Sept. 

Mixed 

I OO 

July, Aug. 

Yel. and or. shades 

25 

April, May 

Golden yellow 

25 

June-Sept. 

Purple 

25 

June-Aug. 

Pale blue 

50 

April, May 

Violet-purple 

25 

May, June 

Mixed 

25 

May, June 

White 

25 

May, June 

Pale blue and white 

25 

May, June 

Pale yellow 

25 

Mav, June 

Copper and buff 

75 

April-June 

Blue and white 

25 

May, June 

Light blue and white 

I OO 

May, June 

Mixed 

50 

May, June 

Pink 

50 

May, June 

Mixed 

25 

May, June 

White ’ 

25 

April, May 

White 

25 

June-Aug. 

Rosy crimson 

35 

Sept., Oct. 

Lilac-blue 

50 

Sept., Oct. 
June-Sept. 

Mixed 

15 

Blue 

25 

May, June 

Bluish purple 

50 

June-Sept. 

Rich blue 

50 

July-Oct. 

Ass’t largest flowering 

50 

April, May 

Dark violet 

50 

April, May 

Rosy carmine 

25 

April-June 

White 

25 

April-June 

Pink 

25 

April-J une 

Red 

25 

April-June 

Mixed 

25 

June-Aug. 

Deep blue 

15 

June-Aug. 

White 

15 

June, July 

Blue 

20 

June, July 

Blue 

25 

June, July 

White 

25 

June, July 
Aug., Sept. 

White, double 

30 

Blue 

20 

Aug., Sept. 

White 

20 


Height 

Campanula Medium. (Canterbury Bells.) 

Blue 3 ft. 

Carmine-rose 3 ft. 

Mauve 3 ft. 

White 3 ft. 

Mixed 3 ft. 

Campanula Medium calycanthema. 

(Cup and Saucer). Blue 3 ft. 

Mauve 3 ft. 

Rose-pink 3 ft. 

White 3 ft. 

Mixed 3 ft. 

Carnations, Hardy Double Border. 

Aurora 12 in. 

Double Early-flowering. White 12 in. 

Early-flowering American Hybrids. ... 18 in. 

Vienna, Finest Mixed 12 in. 

Schling’s Prize Hardy Border. A superb free-flowering strain with highest percentage 
double flowers of finest quality on long stems; invaluable for cutting. 


Time of 
Flowering 

Color 

Pkt. 

June, July 

Blue 

$0 15 

June, July 

Carmine-rose 

15 

June, July 

Mauve 

15 

June, July 

White 

15 

June, July 

Mixed 

15 

June, July 

Blue 

25 

June, July 

Mauve 

25 

June, July 

Rose-pink 

25 

June, July 

White 

25 

June, July 

Mixed 

25 

May-July 

Buff 

50 

May-J uly 


25 

June-Oct. 

Mixed 

I OO 

May-July 


20 


Yellow and yellow ground vars. Pkt. 50c. 
Pure White, fringed. Pkt. 50c. 


Cerastium tomentosum (Snow-in-Sum 

mer) 

Chrysanthemums. Shasta Dais; 


Triumph, Rose Tints. Pkt. 50c. 
Schling's Prize Mixture. Pkt. 25c. 


Praecox, White Lady. . . . 
New Single Early-flowerir 
Japanese. Hardy; early 1 
limicifuga racemosa (Sna 
loreopsis lanceolata grand 

California Sunbeam 

lianthus Allwoodi 

deltoides (Maiden Pink). 


Hybridum. 9 new varieties; 


Fanny Stormouth 

Hugo Poortman. Heavy spikes. 


Mastodon te. 

Queen Wilhe 
Rev. E. Lascelles. Large flowers. . . . 


1.3-4 ft. 

June-Aug. 

Golden yellow 

50 

.2 ft. 

June-Sept. 

Blue 

25 

.4 in. 

May-July 

Silvery white foliage 

25 

.2 K ft. 

May-Sept. 

White 

15 

• 3 ft. 

July-Sept. 

White 

15 

enny Daisy). A beautiful white Marguerite. 

50 


July-Sept. 

White 

35 


Sept., Oct. 

M ixed 

I OO 

.2 ft. 

Sept., Oct. 

Assorted 

I OO 

• 4-5 ft. 

June-July 

White 

25 

.2 ft. 

June-Oct. 

Golden yellow 

IO 

.2 ft. 

June-Oct. 


IS 

. 1 1 2 ft. 

June to frost 

M ixed 

75 

.8 in. 

June, July 

Pink 

25 

.1 ft. 

June, July 


25 

■ r ft. 


Mixed 

75 

.1 ft. 

June, July 


15 

.r ft. 

June, July 

Mixed colors 

25 

.3 ft. 

June, July 

Assorted 

25 

.5 ft. 

June, July 

Col. 6 named sorts 

I 50 

• 3 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Dark blue 

75 

.4 ft. 


Light azure-blue 

I 00 

.6 ft. 


Light blue 

1 00 

.6 ft. 


Deep blue 

I 00 

.6 ft. 


Porcelain-blue 

I 00 

.5 ft. 


Azure-blue 

I 00 

.6 K ft. 


Dark purplish blue 

I 00 

• 5 ft. 


Soft blue 

I 00 


Deep blue, white center 1 00 


COLLECTION: 1 pkt. each of the above 9 Hybrid Delphiniums, $7.50 


rxr 


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Border A. Especially Attractive as a Foreground to Shrubbery Borders 

25 CHOICE PERENNIALS FOR S5.00 


1. Sweet William, Newport Pink. . . ,25c 

2. Chrysanthemum, Fringed Moon- 

penny Daisy 50c 

3. Pentstemon Torreyi. Pink 50c 

4. Iberis gibraltarica. Pink 35c 

5. Campanula pyramidalis. Blue.... 20c 

6. Alyssum saxatile compactum 25c 

7. Digitalis gloxinioides. Rose 15c 

8. Centaurea montana. Blue 25c 


9. Erinus alpinus 25c 

10. Echinops Ritro 20c 

11. Sweet Rocket 15c 

12. Arabis alpina. White 25c 

13. Delphinium, Gold Medal Hybrids25c 

14. Hibiscus, Mallow Marvel 25c 

15. Coreopsis, California Sunbeam. .. 15c 

16. Pyrethrum roseum hybridum. . . ,25c 

17. Anchusa italica, Dropmore 25c 

18. Rudbeckia purpurea 25c 


19. Lychnis viscaria splendens 25c 

20. Campanula Medium 15c 

21. Siberian Wallflower 50c 

22. Gaillardia, Schling’s New Hybrids. 25c 

23. Dianthus plumarius. Double 20c 

24. Lupinus polyphyllus. Blue 15c 

25. Pentstemon, New Dwarf Hybrids . 75c 

Regular value $6 95 


TEN OUTSTANDING FAVORITES (fr 'J 
OF UNUSUAL HARDY FLOWERS fJ.JU 

AQUILEGIA GLANDULOSA PERFECTA. Violet and white. Pkt. 

2 to 3 ft. May, June $0 35 

CHRYSANTHEMUM PRAECOX, WHITE LADY. Giant 

daisies, filled with quilled and twisted petals 35 

DELPHINIUM, BLACKMORE and LANGDON’S NEW 

GIANT EXHIBITION STRAIN. 6 to 7 ft. June, July so 

DELPHINIUM CHINENSE. 8 in. Well-branched bushes 
with ultramarine-blue flowers about 1 K inches in diameter. 35 
DIANTHUS ALLWOODI. Assorted colors. i'A ft. June.. 75 
DIGITALIS, THE SHIRLEY. Immense spikes of spotted 

flowers in many colors, s to 6 ft. June, July 35 

ERYNGIUM PLANUM AZUREUM. Heavenly blue. 2 ft. 

July, August 50 

ICELAND POPPY, SUNBEAM. Pastel shades. May to Sept. 25 

WALLFLOWER, HARDY ALPINE. Mauve; fragrant 50 

WALLFLOWER, SIBERIAN. Gorgeous orange flowers 50 

Regular value $4 40 



2 


LIST OF HARDY PERENNIALS 


Height 

Delphinium, Belladonna 3 ft. 

Blackmore & Langdon’s Giant Ex- 


Time of 
Flowering 
June-Nov. 


Color 
Pale blue 


Pkt. 
So 25 


Chinese, Blue Butterfly 

chinense, Ultramarine Blue. 


Isabellina. 


The Shirley. 


Edelweiss. 


Erysimum rupestre aurantiacum. . 


Heicirrum auturanale — hybrida nana, 
Prtecox 


Maroon . 
Newport 
Rose. . . . 


Yellow. 
White . . 
Mixed. . 


.6-7 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

50 

. 5-6 ft. 

June, July 

Flaming cardinal-red 

35 

.1 K ft. 

June, July 

Azure-blue 

25 

.8 in. 

Ultramarine blue 

35 

.3 ft. 

June-Sept. 

Dark blue, white center 

20 

.3 ft. 

J une-Sept. 

Light blue 

25 

.5 ft. 

June-Nov. 

Pale blue to deep purple 

25 

. 7-8 ft. 

June, July 

Extra-long broad spikes 

2 00 

.3 ft. 

June, July 

Orange 

75 

meptional vigor, throwing mammoth spikes 

50 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

White 

15 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Purple 

is 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Rose 

15 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

15 

• 5 ft. 

June, July 

Pure yellow 

50 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

25 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

IO 

.7 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

35 

■ 3-4 ft. 

July, Aug. 

Reddish purple 

25 

■ 3-4 ft. 

July, Aug. 

Steel-blue 

20 

.6 in. 

July-Sept. 

Silver-gray 

25 

.5 ft. 

Sept., Oct. 

White 

I 00 

.8-10 ft. 

Sept., Oct. 

Rose 

I 50 

. i A ft. 

July, Aug. 

Pale mauve 

25 

.3 in. 

May, June 

Bright blue 

25 

.2 ft. 

July, Aug. 

Heavenly blue 

50 

,i ft. 

April-July 

Orange 

50 

2 ft. 

Aug., Sept. 

Pure white 

15 

.2 ft. 

Aug., Sept. 
June-Sept. 

Pale purple 

50 

.2 ft. 

Mixed 

50 

2 ft. 

June-Sept. 

Mixed 

15 

.2 ft. 

J une-Sept. 

Mixed 

25 

i A ft. 

May-Sept. 

Double yellow 

50 

iA ft. 

May-Sept. 

Orange-red 

25 

2-3 ft. 

June, July 

White 

15 

2-3 ft. 

June, July 

White 

50 

2-3 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Yellow and brown 

50 

lA ft. 

May-Sept. 

Coral-red 

25 

2-3 ft. 

July, Aug. 

Mixed 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Crimson 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

White with blotch 

50 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Maroon 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 


25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Rose 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Scarlet 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Yellow 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

White 

25 

5-7 ft. 

July-Oct. 

Mixed 

20 


COLLECTION: 1 pkt. each of the above 8 colors of Hollyhocks, $1.75 


New Single Hybrids. 
Honesty ( Lunaria biennis). 


latifolius, Mixed. 


Illumination. (New.). 
Lupinus polyphyllus, B 


Perennial Hybrids, Mixed. 


Attraction . 


Blue Cloud 

Bronze King. . 
Captivation. . . 
Evening Glow. 
Nelly 


Primrose zA ft. 

Prince of Orange 4 ft. 

Queen of the West 4 >2 ft. 

Sunshine 4 ft. 

Taplow Purple 4 ft. 

Zulu 4 ft. 


. .2 ft. 

May, June 

Crimson 


50 

25 


May, June 

Purple 


25 


May, June 

White 


25 

. . i ft. 

May, June 

Delicate lilac 


35 

. . i ft. 

May, June 

Pink and Lavender 

1 

00 


April, May 

Pure white 


25 

. . 16 in. 

May-Sept. 

Pastel shades 


25 

. . i-iK ft. 

June 

Rose 


25 

..lA ft. 

June-Oct. 

Golden yellow 


50 

. .6 ft. 

July, Aug. 

Pink 


25 

. .6 ft. 

July, Aug. 

Mixed 


25 

..i-lK ft. 

July-Sept. 

Blue 


25 


J uly-Sept. 

Rosy purple 


30 

. . 2-3 ft. 

July-Sept. 

Citron-yellow 


50 

..I ft. 

May-Aug. 

Gold 


50 

..I K ft. 

May-Aug. 

Blue 


50 

. .2K-3 ft. 

J uly-Sept. 

Scarlet 


20 

. .2K-3 ft. 

Aug., Sept. 
July-Sept. 

Glowing scarlet 


SO 

. .3-4 ft- 

Deep blue 


20 

. .3-4 ft. 

July-Sept. 

White 


20 

. .3-4 ft. 

July-Sept. 

Pink 


25 

. .4 ft. 

July-Sept. 

Pink and white 


25 

, .4 ft. 

July-Sept. 

Mixed 


20 

flower-spikes often 2 feet in 
ie. 

.3 A ft. May-Aug. 

length. Sixty per cent 

Bright purple and white 


50 

. -3A ft. 

May-Aug. 

Primrose and mauve 

1 

00 

.4 ft. 

May-Aug. 

Soft blue, shaded rose 


75 

.3 A ft. 

May-Aug. 

Bronze 

1 

50 

.4 ft. 

May-Aug. 

Blue and white 


75 

.4 ft. 

May-Aug. 

Mauve and yellow 

1 

00 

• 4 'A ft. 

May-Aug. 

White, tinted mauve 

1 

00 

.3 ft. 

May-Aug. 

Soft flesh-color 

1 

50 


May-Aug. 

May-Aug. 

May-Aug. 

May-Aug. 

May-Aug. 

May-Aug. 


Delicate primrose 
Buff and orange 
Soft primrose-yellow 
Bright golden yellow 
Glowing purple 
Deep violet-purple 


1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 


COLLECTION: One pkt. each of above 14 varieties, $12 


Lythrum roseum superbum. . . . 
Malva crispa (Curled Mallow). 


Myosotideum nobile. Chatham Island 
Giant Forget-me-not; very ran 
Myosotis palustris 


. 1-2 ft. 

June-Aug. 

Orange-scarlet 

30 

.1 ft. 

) une-Aug. 

Orange-scarlet 

25 

.1 ft. 

June-Aug. 

Crimson 

25 

.3-4 ft. 

J uly-Sept. 

Rose 

15 

.4-8 ft. 

June-Sept. 

Rose 

15 

, 1-2 ft. 

June-Sept. 

Rose 

15 

. I-Ij 2 ft. 

June-Oct. 

White 

20 

.3 ft. 

June. July 

Pri mrose-yello w 

50 

.3 ft. 

June, July 

Blue 

50 

3-3K ft. 

July, Aug. 

Bright red 

50 

,iA(t. 

June-Oct. 


1 00 

. 10 in. 

June-Oct. 

Deep blue 

25 

. 10 in. 

June-Oct. 

Bright blue 

25 

.2 ft. 

J uly-Sept. 

Golden yellow 

25 

.3 ft. 

July to frost 

Coral-pink 

50 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

15 

,2 ft. 

Tuly to frost 

Mixed 

75 

.2-3 ft. 

June, July 

Mixed 

25 


Pansies, Schling’s Giant Early Flowering. 

World Record. This remarkable new race of Pansies flowers fully six weeks earlier. 

Celestial Queen. Sky-blue 

Charm of March. Dark velvety blue 

Ice King. Silvery white, dark blue eye 

Jupiter. Dark purplish violet, upper petals white 

Winter Sun. Golden yellow, dark eye 

Wotan. Black 

Splendid Mixed X°z. $i-50. 

COLLECTION: 1 pkt. each of the above 6 varieties, $1.25 
Giant Trimardeau Pansies in Separate Colors: 

Blue Domino. Beautifully ruffled 

Bridesmaid. Soft rose 

Bronze. In many attractive shades 

Cassier’s Five-blotched Golden Yellow 

Cornflower Blue 

Fire King. Golden yellow, upper petals crimson 

Giant Apollo. Bronze, beautifully veined and blotched; edges frilled 

Golden Queen. Pure yellow. 

King of the Blacks (Faust). Velvety black 

Lord Beaconsfield. Purplish violet shading to lavender 

President Carnot. Deep violet with a narrow margin of white on each petal 

Snow Queen. Pure white 

COLLECTION: 1 pkt. each of the preceding 12 colors, $2.50 
Schling’s International Prize. The finest and richest mixture of all Giant Pansies today. . 

Apricot-colored. New and very delicate shades 

Bugnot’s Giant Blotched. A famous French strain. Each petal is handsomely blotched. . 
English and Scotch Show Varieties Mixed. A celebrated collection of Giant I ansies. . . 

Parisian Giants. Giant flowers with a large blotch on each petal 

Red and Reddish Brown. Delightful colors 

Trimardeau Giant Mixed 

Triumph of the Giants. Elegantly frilled flower-petals 

Phlox decussata, Finest Mixed 2-3 ft. July-Oct. 

Decussata, Lierval’s Newest Hybrids. .2-3 ft. July-Oct. 

Physostegia virginica alba 2 ft. June-Sept. 

virginica. Pink 2 ft. June-Sept. 

Platycodon grandiflorum 2 ft. June, July 

grandiflorum album 2 ft. June, July 

Polyanthus, Giant-flowering. Mixed... .6-9 in. April-June 

Poppies, Perennial, Iceland, Yellow 1 ft. May-Sept. 

White and Orange-scarlet 1 ft. May-Sept. 

Iceland, Sunbeam Improved 1 ft. May-Sept. 

Finest Mixed 1 ft. May-Sept. 

Giant White California 6 ft. June, July 

Oriental Hybrids 3 ft. May, June 

Oriental Scarlet 3 ft. May, June 

Orientale, Mrs. Perry 3 ft. May, June 

Orientale, Queen Alexandra 3 ft. May. June 

Potentilla ij< ft. June-Sept. 

Primula auricula 10 in. May, June 

officinalis hybrida 10 in. April, May 

veris (Cowslip) 10 in. April, May 

vulgaris (English Primrose) 6-9 in. April, May 

Pyrethrum roseum hybridum 2 ft. June-Sept. 

roseum hybridum, fl.-pl 2 ft._ June-Sept. 


Pkt. 
$0 25 
25 

25 

25 

25 

25 


50 

50 


50 

15 


Assorted 

Mixed 

White 

Pink 

Blue 

White 

Mixed 

Yellow 


each, 


New tints 
Mixed 
White 

Various shades 
Or. -scarlet, black spots 
Light salmon 
Salmon 

Assorted colors 
Mixed 

Blue and yellow 
Yellow 

Lemon-yellow 
Mixed 
Mixed 


roseum hybridum, New Comet-Flowered. Rolled and twisted petals in all colors. 

Single White, Crimson and Pink June-Sept. 

Rudbeckia Newmanii 2 ft. June-Oct. Orange-yellow 

purpurea 3 ft. July-Sept. Purple 

Salvia azurea grandiflora 2 ft. Aug., Sept. Sky-blue 

farinacea 4-5 ft. July, Aug. Pale blue 

pratensis 2 ft. June, July Deep blue 

Scabiosa caucasica, Blue and White. . . .2—3 ft. June-Aug. 

caucasica. Blue Perfection 2—3 ft. June— Aug. Blue 

Sedum acre 3 in. May-July Yellow 

Maximowiczii 6 in. May-July Yellow 


each. 


each. 


Sempervivum (Live Forever). Cactus-like, desirable for rock-gardens I 


each, 


each. 


Shasta Daisy. 2 A ft. May-Sept. Pure white 

Sidalcea, Hemsley’s New Hybrids 2-4 ft. June-Sept. Mixed 

Statice latifolia (Sea Lavender) 1—2 ft. June, July Delft blue 

Perennial Varieties; Mixed 

Stokesia cyanea. Blue 2 ft. 

Sweet Rocket. Purple and White 2 ft. 

Mixed 2 ft. 

Sweet William ( Dianthus barbalus). 

Auricula-flowered 1 A ft. 

Black Prince iK ft. 

Giant Dark Crimson. (New.) iK ft- 

Giant White iA ft. 

Holborn Glory iK ft. 

Newport Pink lA ft. 

Pink Beauty iA ft. 

Rose Queen iA ft. 

Scarlet Beauty iM ft. 

Single Finest Mixed iK ft. . _ . 

Thalictrum dipterocarpum. 4 ft. Aug.-Sept. Rosy purple. Invaluable for borders 
Tritoma hybrida mirabilis (Red-Hot 

Poker Plant). (New.) 2 ft. 

Valeriana, Crimson. . . I Garden 1 . .3 ft. 

White and Red ( Heliotrope J . .3 ft. 

Veronica amethystina lA ft. 

longifolia 2 A ft. 

spicata. Blue lA ft. 

spicata. Mixed 1K-2 ft. 

Viola cornuta (Tufted Pansies). 

Ardwell Gem 

Black Prince 

Cyclops. (New.) A lovely deep violet-blue 

David Simpson 

Golden Gem io in. 

G. Wermig i ft. 

Jersey Gem. (New.) io in. 

Lord Beaconsfield. New 

Mauve Queen io in. 

Nora Marrow 

Primrose Dame 

Sensation io in. 

White Perfection io in. 

Mixed 

COLLECTION: 1 pkt. each of above 13 varieties of Viola, $3 

Viola odorata semperflorens (Sweet Violet), io in. April, May. Violet 

Wallflower, alpine. New 15 in. May Mauve 

Hardy Siberian. (New.) Survives severest winters. Gorgeous orange flowers. 15 inches 


May-Sept. 
June-Sept. 
June, July 

July-Oct. 
May, June 
May, June 

May-July 
May-July 
May-July 
May-July 
May-July 
May-July 
May-J uly 
May-July 
May-July 
May-July 


July-Oct. 
June, July 
June. July 
April, May 
Aug.-Oct. 
June, July 
May, June 


April-Nov. 
April-Nov. 
May to frost 

April-Nov. 


April-Nov. 

April-Nov. 


35 

25 

50 


50 

50 

35 


50 

25 

25 

00 

15 

75 

25 


Blue 

Mixed 

Mixed 

Velvety black 
Dark crimson 
White 
Mixed 
Pink 

Salmon-pink 
Pale rose 
Intense scarlet 
Mixed 


Orange-scarlet 

Crimson 

Pale blue 
Blue 
Blue 
Mixed 

Primrose 
Very dark 


Lavender and crimson 

Golden yellow 

Deep violet-blue 

Deep blue 

Dark purple 

Mauve 

Bluish blush 

Sulphur-yellow 

Dark blue 

White 

Mixed 


15 

25 

15 


50 

15 

15 

25 

35 


25 

50 


25 

25 

35 

35 

25 


25 

50 


A HARDY BORDER PROPERLY PLANNED AND PLANTED Planting Key to Border B 


1. Hollyhock, Newport Pink 25c 

2. Coreopsis lanceolata 10c 

3. Candytuft, Gibraltarica 35c 

4 . DigitaEs gloxinioides, White 15c 

5. Echinacea purpurea 25c 

6. Sweet Rocket, Purple 15c 

7. Pyrethrum roseum hybridum 25c 

8. Delphinium, Belladonna 25c 

• y' -4- \ 6 I 8 y 1 1 \ ,4 17 ) 20 yC 22 


2 'V 5 ) J 9 T 12 X- IS 



26^ 27 j 30 

' 3 Y"^ 7 1 ,0 \ ' 13 / 16 19 ( 23 


This sketch of a Hardy Border (B) 50 x 5 feet, consisting of 30 choicest Perennials for 
continual bloom, shows how to proceed with the laying out and placement of the plants. 


9. Stokesia cyanea 25c 

10. Sweet William, Newport Pink 25c 

11. Campanula calycanthema, Rose 25c 

12. Pentstemon Torreyi 50c 

13. Gaillardia, Schling’s New Hybrids 25c 

14. Liatris spicata 30c 

15. Lupinus polyphyllus roseus 25c 

16. Wallflower, Siberian 50c 

17. Delphinium, Bellamosa 75c 

18. Centaurea montana 25c 

19. Shasta Daisy 15c 

SPECIAL OFFER (B) 1 


20. Pentstemon Hybrids 15c 

21. Aquilegia, Long-spurred Hybrids 25c 

22. Campanula pyramidalis, White 20c 

23. Scabiosa caucasica, Blue 25c 

24. Delphinium, Gold Medal Hybrids 25c 

25. Veronica spicata 25c 

26. Eupatorium purpureum 50c 

27. Heuchera sanguinea splendens. 25c 

28. Anchusa, Dropmore 25c 

29. Hollyhock, Exquisite 50c 

30. Dianthus plumarius, Double 20c 


of above 30 varieties 
(regular price $8.50) 


$6.00 


STRAWBERRY PLANTS, SWEET PEAS, PEONIES AND IRISES 


3 


Plant a Strawberry Bed this 

ENJOY YOUR OWN BERRIES 

summer next june 

One hundred plants, with fair cultivation, will yield 
thirty quarts of berries the first year in a space of 
only 4 by 50 feet. 

Utilize the vacant spaces in your garden. Our Pot-grown 
Strawberry Plants can be set out any time during July and 
August, and even as late as September 15. Early plantings 
produce biggest crops. Set plants in rows, 1 foot apart. Allow 
space of 2 feet between rows for cultivation. Pinch off all 
runners as they appear and cover the bed lightly with leaves, 
salt hay, or manure in December after the ground is frozen. 
Remove covering in early spring; if salt hay is used it may be 
left between the rows as a soil-mulch to keep the soil moist 
and the berries clean. 


Pot-grown Strawberry Plants 

Ready for shipment July 25, but order now. Early Orders 
always assure Strongest Plants 

All varieties offered are perfect flowering, of largest 
size and best flavor 


Three Specials for the Home Garden 

PREMIER. (Extra early.) The largest and by far the firmest of all early varieties. Fruit 
of a brilliant scarlet-crimson color and very luscious, having a delightful aroma and a rich, 
wild Strawberry flavor. No variety ripens earlier. Excels all others. 

BIG JOE. (Midseason.) An unusually healthy, vigorous, and productive variety. The berries 
are large, light glossy crimson, and of excellent flavor. It is one of the very best of the mid- 
season varieties and we cannot recommend it too highly. The color is particularly attractive. 

CHESAPEAKE. (Late.) Possibly the finest and most luscious of all Strawberries for the 
home garden. The berries are very large and firm and have the luscious flavor of the wild 
Strawberry. The plant produces Strawberries in great quantities. 

In planting the above three varieties, you will lengthen your Strawberry season consider- 
ably and have berries for fully a month. 

Pot-grown plants of the above, $3 for 25, $8.50 per 100 


Marshall. A very large midseason berry of rich flavor and almost devoid of acid, of a beautiful 
dark crimson color when fully ripe; very productive. 

Barrymore. (Midseason.) Large, broad and bluntly conical; firm and of excellent quality. 
Bushel Basket. Recognized as the largest Strawberry. The fruit is firm and of finest flavor. 
$3 for 25, S10 per 100. 

Early Ozark. Large, broad, extra-early; fruit almost square and of a rich flavor. 

Edmund Wilson. The Giant Strawberry, introduced by Dr. Van Fleet. Very dark in color, of 
immense size — individual berries are often the size of a small apple. S3. 50 for 25, S12 per 100. 
Schofield. Berries of enormous size, very broad and thick, of rich aromatic flavor. 

Strong pot-grown plants, except where especially priced, $2.75 for 25, $8 per 100 

Fall or Everbearing Strawberry Plants 

Just as luscious as the June varieties. Bearing in September and October; in fact, they fruit 
continuously from June until frost, but if you want a heavier crop of berries in the fall, pinch out 
all blossoms until about July 20 or August 1. 

PROGRESSIVE. We consider this the best and most productive of the fall-fruiting varieties. 

The berries are produced in large clusters and have a fine aromatic flavor. 

LUCKY BOY. Berries conical in shape, deep red in color, and of good flavor. 

SUPERB. A very vigorous variety that produces quantities of fruit of fine flavor. 

Strong pot-grown plants of Everbearing varieties, $4 for 25, $15 per 100 



Beautiful Garden Iris 

Bearded Iris, or Fleur-de-Lis 


Should be planted in August and September to insure best flowering results the 

following spring 

These Irises bloom in May and June, following the Darwin Tulips and form a most 
delightful group of flowers. All are extremely showy in the garden and furnish ex- 
cellent material for cutting. Our list includes only the most modern varieties. 

“S.” represents standard or upper petals; “F.” falls or lower petals. 


A. E. Kunderd. White, faintly tinged 
lavender, bordered purple. 

Alvelrea. S. light bluish violet; F. deep 
purple with bronze veined throat. 

Amas. S. rich blue; F. violet. 

Beethoven. S. blue; F. royal purple. 

Caprice. S. soft rosy red; F. deeper. 

Dr. Bernice. S. olive, shaded red; F. is 
dark brown-red. 

Fairy. White, suffused soft blue. 

Florentina, Blue. Tall and vigorous; 
deep dark blue. 

Gracchus. S. clear yellow; F. marked 
red, reticulated white. 

Gypsy Queen. S. light bronze; F. pur- 
ple-red. 

Her Majesty. S. rose-pink; F. bright 
crimson. 

Kathleen. S. and F. soft rose-lilac. 

Lady Jane. S. coppery rose; F. red, 
reticulated white. 

Lohengrin. S. and F. uniform shade of 
cattleya rose. 

Any of the above, 3 
Special Collection Offer: 3 each c 
25 at 100 rate. Orders for less tl 


Loreley. S. light yellow; marine-blue, 
bordered cream. 

Monsignor. S. crimson, dotted lavender; 

F. rich crimson, edged lavender. 
Nibelungen. S. olive-green; F. yellow- 
purple and white. 

Pallida Dalmatica. S. lavender; F. 

deep clear lavender. 

Princess Victoria Louise. S. pale yel- 
low; F. rich violet, edged cream. 

Rhein Nixe. S. snowy white; F. deep 
violet-blue, white margin. 

Sherwin Wright. S. and F. golden 
yellow. 

Siberian Blue. Clear sky-blue with 
horizontal falls. 

Tendresse. Delicate lavender and lilac. 
Trautlieb. S. pinkish; F. darker color. 
Walhalla. S. lavender; F. wine-red. 
Zephyr. S. and F. clear blue-lilac; 
fragrant. 

for 10, $20 per 100 

above 26 varieties (78 in all), $20. 

n 3 of one variety cannot be filled 


Very Special: GERMAN IRIS IN MIXTURE for Mass 

Planting 

A beautiful mixture comprising only the modern improved varieties, just what 
you want for mass planting, to naturalize in beds, as an outline to shrubbery, along 
woodland walks, etc. 

Strong flowering roots, very specially priced, $1.25 per doz., $7 per 100, $60 per 1,000 


Superb Modern Peonies 

FOR FALL PLANTING 

A selection made now assures a special pick of the strongest roots 
WE BEGIN TO SHIP OUR PEONY ROOTS IN SEPTEMBER— ORDER NOW 

Always plant Peonies in the fall, for the roots are then in prime condition. While 
they grow well in any good garden soil, they will amply repay any time spent in 
manuring the surface. Care should be taken to keep the manure a few inches away 
from the crowns of the plants, except the first winter, when a coarse mulch an inch 
or more deep may be placed directly over the plants to prevent the frost from heaving 
them. It is not necessary to fertilize rich soil. In poor soil, the manure should be kept 
10 inches from the surface, and well mixed with the subsoil; after planting, apply 
manure to surface, as previously advised. Never allow manure to come in contact 
with the roots as it rots them. Set roots 2 feet or more apart and cover top eyes 
not more than 2 to 3 inches; deep planting often results in blind growth. 

Our Peonies are extra-strong 1-year-old field-grown roots (not divisions) 


00 

00 

25 


THE BEST PEONIES FOR 1927 x . year 

Alexander Dumas. Early midseason. Predominating color brilliant pink; 

chamois, white, and salmon petals intermingling $1 50 

Asa Gray. Midseason. Pale pink, powdered with rosy dots 2 50 

♦Atrosanguinea. Midseason. Rich scarlet-crimson. Yellow stamens give a most 

pleasing effect to the flower 2 

Avalanche. Midseason. Blush-white, with pale pink center 2 

Boule de Neige. Early midseason. Milky white; outer and center petals 

marked crimson 1 

*Canari. Midseason. Fleshy white, changing to white; yellow center 1 25 

Couronne d’Or. Late. Snow-white, reflecting yellow; center petals edged 

carmine. Yellow stamens visible ... • ■ - - — 1 

♦Delachei. Late midseason. Dark crimson i 1 Ov 

Dr. Bretonneau (Verdier). Early midseason. Uniform soft pink 1 00 

♦Duchesse de Nemours. Early. Outer petals white; center sulphur-white, 

changing to white. Popular for cut-flowers 1 

*Duchesse d’Orleans. Late midseason. Deep pink guard petals; center soft 

pink and salmon 1 

♦Edulis Superha. Early. Rich rose-pink. Very fragrant. Fine for cut-flowers. 1 

Eugene Bigot. Late. Velvety, brilliant red 2 

♦Felix Crousse. Midseason. Even shade of clear red 1 

*Fe8tiva Maxima. Early. Pure white; center petals edged carmine. Most 

popular white peony 1 00 

Jeanne d’Arc. Midseason. Sulphur-white, soft pink, and rose. Center 

petals spotted carmine 1 25 

La Tulipe. Midseason. Very delicate blush. Center petals edged and outer 

petals striped carmine 1 00 

L’Indispensable. Late. Lilac-white, shading to pale violet 1 50 

Livingstone. Late. Delicate pink 1 50 

♦Mme. Calot. Early. Flesh-pink. Beautiful 1 00 

Mme. Auguste Dessert. Early midseason. Old-rose pink with golden center. 2 50 

Mme. Ducel. Midseason. Silvery pink, compact bomb-shaped flowers 1 50 

*Mme. de Galhau. Late. Salmon-flesh pink; silvery reflex 1 50 

♦Mme. de Verneville. Early midseason. Pure white, center shaded blush, 

with few petals edged carmine 1 

♦Marguerite Gerard. Midseason. Very large; flesh-pink deepening to rose .. . 1 
Marie Lemoine. Very late. Large, ivory-white flower; center occasionally 

traced carmine 1 

Modele de Perfection. Late. Flesh-pink, deepening to bright rose in center . 
Philomele. Midseason. Bright rose outer petals enclosing a golden tufted center . 
Pierre Reignoux. Early midseason. Uniform light Tyrian-rose. Very distinct, z 

Queen Victoria. Early. White, tinted blush 1 

Any of the above sold separately at the prices quoted 
The entire collection — I bulb each of the 30 varieties, 1 year old, $35, 
regular value $42 

Collection, 1 bulb each of 12 varieties marked (*), $12, regular value $14.50 


00 


50 
1 50 

1 25 

2 00 
1 00 


RARE PEONIES 

Adolphe Rousseau. Early. Rich, deep red bloom of loose formation. Very 

strong grower 5 00 

Frances Willard. Midseason. Blush-white, changing to white. One of the 

finest white peonies in existence today : • 6 00 

Lady Alexandra Duff. Midseason. Pale blush-pink, changing to white. 

Reliable bloomer. A scarce variety of unusual merit 6 00 

Martha Bulloch. Late midseason. Extremely large bloom; deep rose-pink 

center, outer petals changing to delicate shell-pink. A peerless peony ...... 15 00 

Primevere. Midseason. Outer row of petals sulphur-white; center rich 

canary-yellow. “The best yellow” _ 6 00 

Sarah Bernhardt. Late midseason. Fine apple blossom pink, turning to 

silvery pink at edge of petals. A variety sure to please. 5 00 

Novelty collection, 1 each of above 6 varieties $38, regular value $43 


(( 


SEERITE 


J? The Perfect Label for Perennials. 
Always Readable 


Your garden label is enclosed in “Seerite’s” sturdy, clear glass cylinder, and tightly sealed with 
the cork-tipped wooden peg. In spite of watering can or rainstorms it stays readable always! 



NOT AFFECTED BY ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS 

8 in a box for $1, 100 in a box for $11 



Insures uniform distribution of the finest seeds 


GROW YOUR OWN 


HARDY FLOWERS FROM SEED 

It’s Lots More Fun — NOW is the Best Time to Do It 


Everybody wants Perennials — and wants them 
in generous measure, to secure the desired effects 
in color and charm. If you delay and finally 
buy plants, the cost mounts high; an attractive 
Perennial border may require several hundred 
dollars’ worth of plants. 

Exactly the same result can be secured with 
$10 to $15 worth of SEEDS 1 And aside from 
the money-saving you have the fascination of 
growing your own plants, nursing them from the 
beginning, and loving them all the more ! Sow your 
seeds now, and the plants will bloom next year. 


1927 


U. S. POSTAGE 

V/2C. Paid. 

New York, N. Y. 
Permit No. 2785. 




United States Dept. of Agriculture. 
Dept, of Horticulture, 

Washington, D. C. 


^cl\lii\g$ Seeds 


618 Madison Ave., 
at 59th Street, 
New York City 


POT-GROWN STRAWBERRY PLANTS. See page 3 


The Rock-Garden 


What a wealth of pleasure awaits the garden-lover who plans and builds a rock-garden, and there are really 
few places where something of this sort might not be attempted, especially where rocks and stones are plentiful. 
And how interesting to watch the development of the many rare and charming plants that spread, creep, and 
cover the ground, and hang over and partly hide the rocks. 

Here is a select list of seeds of hardy plants which are happy growing between the crevices of stones and on 
elevated positions. To enhance the pleasure derived from a rock-garden, grow your own plants from seed. 


The entire Collection of seeds for the Rock-Garden— 50 varle V aii.®ir 5 ‘ 4S $12 



$0 25 
10 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 

. 25 

50 
25 
50 
50 
50 
25 
10 
35 
25 
25 
25 
35 
25 
25 
25 
25 
35 
25 
25 
50 
50 
25 
25 
25 
20 
50 
25 
25 
35 
20 
20 
50 
20 
25 
25 
25 

. 1 00 
25 
25 
20 
35 
50 

$15 45 


Achillea millefolium nibrum 

Agrostemma coronaria atrosanguinea 

Alyssum saxatile compactum 

Anemone pulsatilla. Violet-purple. 9 to 12 in 

Anemone sylvestris. White. 1 ft 

Aquilegia caerulea. Blue 

Aquilegia, Long-spurred Hybrid 

Arabis alpina (Rock Cress). White 

Armeria (Felbach Beauty). Soft rose. 1ft 

Aster alpinus, Blue. (Dwarf.) 1ft 

Aster alpinus, Goliath. Blush-purple. 6 to 10 in 

Aster alpinus superbus. Rich blue. 1 ft 

Aster alpinus, amellus hybrids. (Dwarf.) 2 ft 

Aubrietia Leichtlinii (Pink Rock Cress) 

Campanula carpatica. Blue 

Candytuft (Iberis) gibraltarica. Lavender-pink 

Candytuft (Iberis) sempervirens. White 

Cerastium tomentosum (Snow-in-Summer) 

Delphinium chinense. Blue Butterfly. 8 in 

Delphinium chinense. Ultramarine-blue. 1 Vi ft 

Dianthus deltoides (Maiden Pink) 

Edelweiss. 6 in 

Erinus alpinus. 6 in. Blue 

Geum, Mrs. Bradshaw. 1 Vi ft 

Gypsophila repens. Trailing. Clouds of white flowers 

Heuchera sanguinea splendens. 1% ft 

Incarvillea Delavayi. 1 ft 

Linum, Gold Cup. 1 ft 

Linum, Heavenly Blue. 1 ft 

Lychnis Haageana hybrida. 1 ft 

Lychnis viscaria splendens. 1 ft 

Myosotis palustris semperflorens. 10 in 

CEnothera Youugi. Yellow. 1 ft 

Peiitstemon Toneyi. Coral-pink. zyjii 

Physostegia virginica. Pink. 2 ft 

Polyanthus Giant-flowering. 6 in 

Potentilla. Assorted Art Shades. 1 Vi ft 

Primula vulgaris (English Primrose). 6 to 9 in 

Primula veris (Cowslip). 10 in 

Primula officinalis hybrida. Blue and yellow. 10 in 

Poppy, Iceland. 1 ft 

Salvia pratensis. Blue. 2 ft 

Sedum acre (Yellow Stonecrop). 3 in 

Sedum Maximowiczii (Golden Stonecrop). 6 in 

Sempervivum (Liveforever). 3 in 

Statice latifolia (Sea Lavender). 2 ft 

Tunica Saxifraga. Pink. 1 ft 

Veronica spicata (Blue Speedwell). lVi ft 

Viola cornuta, Sensation. Dark blue. 10 in 

Wallflower, Siberian. 10 to 15 in 

INDIVIDUAL SELECTION AT PACKET PRICE 


NEW AND RARE 
FLOWERS FOR 1927 

Anchusa italica, Opal. Lovely sprays of pale Pkt. 


blue forget-me-not-like flowers. 4 ft SO 50 

Armeria Laucheana (Double Sea Thrift). 

Deep rose, blooms from June to August. 
Excellent for rock-garden and border. 6 in . 35 

Centaurea macrocephala, Rays of Gold. 

Deep golden yellow, finely laced flowers, 
resembling the Scotch thistle in shape and 

size, borne on 3 to 4-foot stems 50 

Columbine, Copper Queen. Charming 
copper-red blooms, with long spurs of a 

darker hue; inside of corolla buff or tan 75 

Carnations, Early-flowering American 


Hybrid. Obtained by crossing the American 
greenhouse Carnations with the French 
remontant varieties. Produce flowers out- 
doors equal to our finest greenhouse varie- 


ties. Mottled, striped and new shades of 
salmon and purple are included 1 00 

Delphinium cardinale, Illumination. 

Flaming cardinal-red flowers on spikes 5 to 
6 feet tall 35 

Delphinium Hollyhock, Wrexham 


Hybrids. Conspicuous for their strong, 
broad spikes. Grows to great length, holly- 
hock-like. A revelation to Delphinium lovers. 2 00 
Eremurus. A rare and very imposing peren- 
nial from the Himalaya Mountains. It 
sends up great stalks of flowers, often 5 to 
10 feet high. Attractive in the border. 


himalaicus. White. 5 to 6 ft... 1 0( j 

robustus. Rose. Most attractive. 8 to 

10 ft . . . . 1 50 

Iberis, Schling’s New Hybrids. A glorious 

ncr r plant for the rock-garden or in the 
foreground of hardy borders. Covered with 
large umbels of fragrant flowers in shades of 
lavender and pink, delightfully scented. 

Single plants 18 inches 1 00 

Inula royliana (Golden Marguerite). Giant 
golden yellow daisy -with long, narrow ray- 
shaped florets forming a flower fully 4 
inches across. An excellent cut-flower 50 


Lupines, New Giant Hybrids. Obtained 
by crossing Lupinus polyphyllvs and L. 
arboreus. Plants are often 3J4 to 5 feet high, 
with giant spikes of sweet-scented blooms 
2 feet in length. Blooms from May to August 


and come 60 per cent true from seed 1 00 

[econopsis Wallichi (Blue Himalayan 
Poppy). Graceful, drooping, tulip-shaped 
flowers on 2-foot stems 50 


Pentstemon, Schling’s New Giant-flower- 
ing Dwarf. Sturdy, compact plants, bloom 
from July to frost, these gay-colored, new 
dwarf hybrids will win the admiration of 
every flower-lover. Good for cutting, flowers 
of larger size than the ordinary Pentstemon, 

and the color markings are exquisite 75 

Sidalcea, Hemsley’s New Hybrids. A very 
graceful perennial for cutting. The long 
spikes of bloom come in lovely shades of 
pale pink, deep pink, and carmine, from 

June till September. 3 to 4 feet high 75 

Viola cornuta, Jersey Gem. Beautiful 
giant Violets, three times as large as the 
ordinary varieties, and of deep blue color, 
are borne on 10 to 12-inch stems. Blooms 
continuously from June till frost 75